Delicious Flavors for Wedding Favors

Wooo!  Wedding season is almost upon us!  I know this because the first of the five weddings on my summer calendar (that’s right, FIVE)  is coming up the week after next.  Yikes!   Can’t wait to show off my pasty white winter legs on the dance floor!

Anyhoo, Fat Toad Farm has some fabulously adorable and delicious wedding favor and gift options for this season, check ‘em out below, visit our website, and then call or email us for more info!

Make this season of loooooooooove a little bit sweeter with Farmstead Goat’s Milk Caramel from Fat Toad Farm!

 

 

A Spring Walk in the Woods Yields Buried Treasure

God bless fiddleheads.  My dad and I picked these yesterday (in a spot that will remain undisclosed), washed them, boiled them and added them to our dinner salad.  Hmmmmmmm, soooooo goooooooooood.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are the rules of fiddleheading according to Farmer Steve (pictured below a’hunting with Molly):

1. Pick no more than one or two fiddleheads per stand.  It you never want to find fiddleheads there again, by all means, pick more.

2. Stick to the lowest ones – once the fiddleheads have unfurled more than a half inch of their stem they’re no good.

3. Remember that picking fiddleheads is the easy part, cleaning them is a real bastard so, as exciting as it is to discover them, try not to get carried away in the picking phase.  Pick only as many as you can stand to peel the brown film off one-by-one when you get them home.

4. Enjoy!  There’s nothing better than freshly picked fiddleheads for dinner… except maybe freshly picked chanterelle mushrooms – which folks in this neighborhood literally go to war over in the summertime.

Boo found these beauties and laid down right next to them to mark the spot.  (Read: Boo got tired and flopped down wherever he happened to be standing – mercifully right next to a beautiful clump of fiddleheads and not right on top of them.)  Thanks, Boo!

Representing the Southern States

Are Proud Mama Bama (made famous this spring by giving birth to quadruplets, and made infamous by doing it in the middle of the night) and her baby girl Georgia.

Georgia was the last of the four babies to arrive and by far the biggest, which is odd, usually multiple babies get smaller in succession.  Georgia also had what we call “funny, bendy leg syndrome” (a very technical term) for a week or so.  She was apparently denied the ability to stretch her long legs on the inside, and was unable to straighten her knees all the way when finally on the outside.  A little vitamin E did the job though, and now she’s racing about the barn like a maniac with the best of them!

A Pea Tree Orchard

Check out our crazy new sweet pea orchard!   This is the brainchild of our brilliant and crafty neighbor John of Spruce Lane Farm.  The idea is basically to trellis our sweet pea plants, but by using cut brush instead of standard trellis materials.

A sweet pea orchard

The peas, planted along either side of the brush rows, will (because vegetables always do exactly what is expected of them) club up the trunk of the brush and out the branches – theoretically making them easier to pick.  This strategy, assuming it works, also has the added benefit of purging the neighborhood of unwanted brush.

We are fascinated and can’t wait to see if this works.  We’ll be sure to report back!

p.s. John says the patent is pending.  :)

Lemon Chess Pie with Fat Toad Farm’s Very Own Crème Fraiche

After chores, caramel, chores, gardening, caramel, cheese-making, and chores yesterday, our fabulous and shockingly industrious interns – Lily, Elisa & Melissa – still had the time and energy to make Lemon Chess Pie last night with a ridiculous Fat Toad Farm original crème fraiche.   We all ate a slice (or two in some cases) for breakfast this morning during our weekly farm meeting and it was so delicious we had to make it an agenda item to make sure proper respect was paid.   I recommend you all make this immediately if not sooner.

Check out the recipe from Bon Appetit here: http://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/2011/11/buttermilk-lemon-chess-pie.  Elisa substituted goat’s milk for buttermilk and added a dash of vinegar and a dash of cayenne for a little extra kick.

Lily’s recipe for FTF’s original Crème Fraiche is something like this:

  • 1/2 cup plain fresh chevre
  • 1/4 cup goat’s milk & half & half combo – depending on how healthy you’re feeling
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons maple syrup

Time to Brush up on your Greek and Roman Mythology

Before I introduce this next family of three:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First we have mama Jupiter – another one of our ace milkers – named after the King of the Gods in ancient Roman religion and also the the god of Sky and Thunder.  Next year the name Zeus will have to be in the running.  Next to Jupiter we have her daughter Apollo – the god of light and sun …and apparently also friendliness. It’s like having a shadow every time you walk into the barn, and pants-nibbling shadow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
And finally we have Apollo’s twin sister (both in real life at FTF and according to ancient Greek Mythology) Artemis – the goddess of the hunt.  Artemis declined to join the family photo, opting instead for a solo shot with Melissa, the Greek Goddess of capturing baby goats.

All the Stragglers

At midnight on the 12th, Stella, one of our yearlings,  gave birth to three tiny doelings.  This is our first yearling to have multiples, let alone three very small and weak kids.   Stella seemed to be favoring the strongest kid.  On Friday the 13th, we decided that we had two house-goats that we would raise inside until someone claimed them.

The one in the middle is a panda.

Unfortunately, being very tender and weak, one of the little girls developed scours(diarrhea – very common and very deadly in newborn goats)  and was lost.  The other sits on my lap like a cat when I type and makes little bleats if I move too much and disturb her rest.   We found a home for her and her stronger sister.  She’ll be departing this afternoon.

Lovely April Weather We’re Having

If you are very, very good at Fat Toad Farm, you get to work in the warm green picking lettuce on horrid cold and rainy days like today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you are very, very bad at Fat Toad Farm, or just unlucky in the case of Elisa here, you get stuck trimming back the blackberries outside in the drizzle that sometimes changes to sleet and then back to drizzle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dear lord, please send us some warm sun before we shrivel up and die.

A Family of Clouds

We wanted to start introducing our readers to some of the new goat families living out in our greenhouse barn – the doelings we have decided to keep as future milkers and their proud mamas.  I thought I’d start with one of our all-time greatest milkers Cloud and her two little girls Nimbus and Cirrus.  Even while feeding two babies Cloud still out milks a large percentage of the herd – she’s a maniac!